Europa Universalis IV issues Mandate of Heaven on 6 April

Europa Universalis IV issues Mandate of Heaven on 6 April

Paradox have consulted with their Asian scholars and come up with a 6 April release date for the Mandate of Heaven DLC for Europa Universalis IV. As previously described, this one expands the major nations of East Asia in (hopefully) interesting ways.

Like other Europa Universalis IV expansions that are on the larger side, Mandate of Heaven will cost $20. Being able to enact greater control over the Japanese Shogunate and Celestial Empire doesn’t come cheap. For more on the DLC, here’s Paradox’s official page for it.

The studio will be running a livestream tomorrow (14 March) at 2.00pm CET (6am Pacific, apparently), giving everybody a look at some of the features in the expansion. Speaking of which, this is a summary of what to expect.

  • Historical Ages and Golden Eras: Meet objectives in four historical ages from the Age of Discovery to the Age of Revolutions, earning new bonuses and powers for your country. Declare a Golden Era to further increase your chance of success.
  • Chinese Empire: New mechanics for Ming China, including Imperial Decrees and Imperial Reforms to bolster the Dragon Throne.
  • Tributaries: Force your neighbors to pay tribute to your Chinese Empire, paying you in gold, manpower or monarch points.
  • New Japanese Rules: Daimyos now owe loyalty to the Shogun – and the Shogun is whomever controls the imperial capital of Kyoto. Force your lesser rivals to commit seppuku to preserve their honor.
  • Manchu Banners: Rally the Manchu warlords around your throne and call up the traditional banners to reinforce your army.
  • Diplomatic Macrobuilder: Common diplomatic actions are now easily available from the macrobuilder interface.
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