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    The PC audio market has plenty of options for gaming audio, especially when it comes to companies like Turtle Beach. Traditionally, this market has been reserved for wired headsets. As technology continues to evolve, some of the big competitors in the PC audio space, too, have adapted. This has led companies to pursue more robust options when it comes to wireless gaming audio. Turtle Beach has positioned itself not only on the casual side but also on the audiophile side as well. The Elite Atlas Aero is the marriage of these two intersections, providing a “premium” wireless audio experience.

    Elite specifications

    One of the focal points thus far for the Elite Atlas Aero is its reported 30-hour battery life. This is far more extensive than most headsets on the market, including our recent review of the RIG 700HD, an entry-level headset that sported a 12-hour battery life.

    Desktop Control Studio

    Turtle Beach isn’t just letting you plug your headset into a computer and calling it a day. The company has been working to provide additional offerings when it comes to sound customization and preference. This comes in the form of the Turtle Beach Control Studio, deploying Waves Nx, a technology that looks to transform traditional surround sound into 3D immersive sound. As it stands right now, other companies have been focusing on similar technologies, utilizing features of Windows Sonic.

    For competitive players, the feature known as “Superhuman Hearing” looks to assist you in competitive play. To go along with this, there is an additional Waves Maxx suite, allowing for custom sound settings for tuning mic, chat, and game audio.

    The Turtle Beach Elite Atlas Aero is now available for purchase. Picking up the headset also brings a 12-month subscription to streaming music service TIDAL. The new headset will run you $149.99 and is available on the official Turtle Beach site.

    Greg Bargas
    A console gamer gone rogue. Collector of retro games, pun , and dad joke enthusiast. For the most part, you can find me stressing over platformers, shooters, puzzlers, horror, and the occasional racer. Sometimes, action RPGs squeak their way into my library. Sorry, my eyes say yes to JRPGs, but my brain, my brain says, "Nah."My Spotify playlists are out of control. Sometimes powerlifter and podcast guest.Rocket League anyone?Twitter: @enthusiast_greg

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