Cooler Master MM712 review gaming mouse rgb

As someone with smaller hands who prefers a palm grip, finding a comfortable gaming mouse can be tough. More often than not I find myself struggling to have any sort of comfort with most gaming mice. Luckily, I found the Cooler Master MM712 wireless mouse. Rather, I should say it found me.

The MM712 is the latest in the company’s lightweight gaming mouse offerings, built for general use such as FPS titles and the like. The main draws are clearly the lightweight design and wireless functionality, but there’s plenty more tech packed into this mouse which makes it impressive.

 

Cooler Master MM712 gaming mouse specs

Here are the major specs to note for the Cooler Master MM712 gaming mouse. You can find the rest on the official product page.

Feature Description
Color and finish Black or white
Material ABS plastic, rubber, PTFE feet
Handedness and grip Right-handed – Palm, claw
Sensor PixArt Optical
Tracking speed 400 IPS
DPI range 400-800-1200(default) – 1600-3200-8000-19000
# of buttons Six
Primary switches Optical switches – 70 million click rating
RGB lighting Yes – brand logo at palm section
Software support Yes – MasterPlus+
Connectivity Wired, 2.4 GHz, Bluetooth 5.1
Range 30ft
Battery life Bluetooth mode: 180hrs, 2.4GHz mode: 80hrs
Polling response rate 2.4GHz/wired: 1000 Hz, Bluetooth: 125 Hz
Onboard memory No
Cable length and material 1.8m / 6ft Type-C to A woven cord
Weight and tuning 59g
Dimensions 116.5(L) x 62.4(W) x 38.3(H) mm / 4.6(L) x 2.5(W) x 1.5(H) in
Warranty Two years
Price $69.99 USD

The MM712 weighs in at just 59g (0.13lb) and is perfect for smaller hands since it measures out to 4.6 x 2.5 x 1.5 inches.

If you are a claw grip user, this may not be the best option for you despite what the spec sheet says. Though, it really comes down to how it feels in your hand. Palm or fingertip grip users won’t have any issues, provided you don’t have large or extra large hands. To help with that grip, the mouse comes with optional attachable padding for better control.

The MM712 offers six buttons in total. There are the three standard buttons plus two side buttons that sit under your thumb. The sixth button is the DPI cycle button that sits on the underside of the mouse. To customize these buttons, as well as the RGB lighting on the palm, you’ll use Cooler Master’s MasterPlus+ software.

Connection and use

The mouse offers three ways to connect to a computer: 2.4GHz via the included dongle, Bluetooth 5.1, or wired via the 6ft USB-C to USB-A. While many would assume the wired connection is best, I found all three to be just as reliable as the others. Bluetooth is the best bet though, solely because it leaves USB ports open for other peripherals without that option, but it does depend on your gaming preference and hardware setup. The only time I found myself ever plugging the mouse in was when it needed to be charged.

Speaking of charging, I only needed to do so once during my testing over two weeks. Cooler Master states that in Bluetooth mode the battery can last up to 180 hours and 80 hours in 2.4GHz. Seeing as I used it in both modes pretty consistently, it’s safe to say that the claims are pretty accurate.

The mouse features a 400 IPS tracking speed with a DPI ranging from 400 up to 19,000, making it one of the more versatile gaming mice from Cooler Master. Because of its light weight and tracking speeds, it’s a mouse that I found success with no matter the type of game I played.

Cooler Master Mm172 Gaming Mouse Review

(Image credit: Cooler Master).

When bouncing back and forth between Bluetooth and 2.4GHz connections, the only difference comes with the games you decide to play. The polling rates are drastically different with wired and 2.4GHz, coming in at 1,000Hz. Bluetooth only reaches 125Hz, which results in noticeable latency. Playing games like Cities: Skylines or Songs of Conquest were no issue via Bluetooth. And while games like Counter Strike: Global Offensive worked perfectly fine with the Bluetooth connection, those who find themselves more on the competitive side of the line may feel better using the mouse with the 2.4GHz dongle for less delay. Most gamers, however, won’t notice the difference much.

Other faster-paced games like Escape From Tarkov, Age of Empires II: Definitive Edition, and Insurgency: Sandstorm felt great when using the side buttons. These sit perfectly under your thumb and it becomes second nature to use.

The light weight of the mouse also makes it extremely easy to move it around, and there was no delay in tracking response time. The sensor might be one of the best I’ve ever used on a Cooler Master peripheral, and I don’t say that lightly. It’s so good that even if you find yourself getting a little bit wild with movement where the mouse slightly lifts off the surface, it should still track well enough to keep you moving and on target. Clicking actuation also feels immediate and you won’t find your hand slipping at any point. Personally, I find it so much better than the honeycomb design of the predecessor MM711.

Cooler Master MM712 review side buttons

(Image credit: Cooler Master).

Cooler Master MM712 review verdict

Overall, I highly recommend the Cooler Master MM712. It’s a comfortable mouse for anyone with small or medium-sized hands, and it’s as responsive as anything else the company has put out. The battery life is fantastic, and every game feels great no matter the genre.

There’s no doubt this will be my daily driver for quite some time, and may just be the best gaming mouse I’ve ever used despite having just the two extra side buttons. If I had to nitpick, I would’ve liked the DPI button to be quicker to access for faster adjustments. But that comes into play so rarely that it doesn’t impact my feelings towards this mouse at all. The Cooler Master MM712 is that damn good.

Cooler Master MM712

10

The Cooler Master MM712 is a gaming mouse that's excellent no matter the connection or game type. At an easy-to-swallow price, it's impossible to not recommend it to those looking for something new.

Mike Straw
Michael Straw is a gamer who just happens to be an experienced journalist. In his near decade-long career, Mike has covered some of the biggest events in the world from E3 to the NFL Draft. He was once the second-ranked player in the world in NHL 09 on Xbox Live, and is a trained professional wrestler. In addition to being the Hardware Editor of PCI, Mike is also the Managing Editor of Sports Gamers Online.

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