Pentiment release art style historical

Most players know Obsidian Entertainment for its RPGs, particularly its big-budget ones like Fallout: New Vegas and The Outer Worlds. These titles almost always come up whenever people talk about the developer, which may lead to the assumption that Obsidian exclusively specializes in making these kinds of games. But as Pentiment, one of its more recent projects, demonstrates, Obsidian is more than capable of stepping outside of its comfort zone. A narrative adventure game depicted “through the style of illuminated manuscripts and early modern woodcuts,” Pentiment promises to offer a unique storytelling experience once its November 15 release date arrives.

According to Mikey Dowling, the director of communications at Obsidian Entertainment, Pentiment takes place in upper Bavaria during the 16th century, when the Holy Roman Empire asserted its dominance. Players assume control of Andreas Maler, a skilled artist who suddenly finds himself broiled up in all kinds of murders and scandals that took place over the course of a quarter century.

 

A sandbox of sleuthing

Players have a great degree of influence over Andreas’ actions and background, so he can approach and solve the game’s myriad mysteries in all sorts of ways. For example, players may choose to slip into the abbey library during the night and take a gander at secret documents to investigate a particular murder. Additionally, another mystery could see players opting to participate in a card game at a local tavern and extract information from nearby players. As is customary with these narrative-driven games, every decision players make will supposedly come with some sort of long-term consequence.

Those attending Gamescom in-person will have the opportunity to experience Pentiment before its release thanks to a playable demo located on the show floor. This demo will start players off “after the events of the first murder,” and they can pick one of three leads to see where it will take them.

Daniel Pinheiro
Daniel is a games journalist who is deeply passionate about the medium and the impact it can have on our lives. He is open to all kinds of genres, but has a particular affinity for platformers and beat 'em ups. He also helped back the Kickstarter for The Wonderful 101: Remastered.

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