June 20th, 2017

Pimp your ride: GRID 2’s mod support detailed

Grid 2 04
My own tyre mod wasn’t particularly successful.

Codemasters have announced that mod support will be added to their arcade-y but simulator-y racing game GRID 2 in the forthcoming Community Patch.

Previously, mods were somewhat pointless because of anti-cheating measures: modified game files would cause the game to disable online access, achievements, and saving. Now… well, they’re slightly less pointless, as Codies are adding basic support to the game which will let the game save your modded progress in a separate save file. Still no online play or achievements, but at least you can toy with the game to your liking and not lose all your progress when you quit. Codies note that this will be a separate save file to your regular one, too, so you’re not going to lock yourself out of anything forever.

Suggestions of what you’ll be able to do include “new custom liveries or various colours of tyre smoke and other creative endeavours.”

Not a bad start, but not quite up to the heights of PC modding. It’d be nice to see, say, mod-enabled multiplayer servers so that other people can see your custom liveries (which will inevitably involve cocks), or even custom vehicles and the like. Still, we’ll see where they go from here.

You can read up on the rest of the Community Patch details here, and see what I thought of GRID 2 here. You can even watch Peter and I playing it very badly here! We do spoil you. No word on when the Community Patch will be appearing, but all hints indicate that it’s not too far off.

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  • Tim McDonald

    Tim has been playing PC games for longer than he’s willing to admit. He’s written for a number of publications, but has been with PC Invasion – in all its various incarnations – for over a decade. When not writing things about games, Tim can occasionally be found speedrunning some really terrible ones, making people angry in Dota 2, or playing something obscure and random. He’s also weirdly proud of his status as (probably) the Isle of Man’s only professional games journalist.